Bianca Brown, KS

Senior Writer

Based in Kansas, Bianca writes human interest stories, creative non-fiction, historical timelines, and business-to-business ad scripts. Her clients include Sunflower Publishing in Lawrence, Kansas, Hewlett Packard with Big Picture Lab in Austin, Texas, and multimedia artist Satta based in Los Angeles. Bianca has a B.A. in English and Creative Writing from the University of Kansas. She co-hosts a film review podcast, Screen Gab, and loves to make YouTube videos.

As a Story Terrace writer, Bianca interviews customers and turns their life stories into books. Get to know her better by reading her autobiographical anecdote below.

You’re doing it Right, Rest Assured

I hated running the Pacer Test in elementary school. I hated running in general, and still hate running until this day. But for some reason, I had decided to join track & field when I was in junior high school.

During the first few days after I joined the team, everything ached, especially my legs, and the pain didn’t disappear even days later. My lungs would burn and roar with every breath and would remind me that I was completely out of shape.

After school, my team would meet on the track to start warming up. Our warm-up consisted of endless amounts of push-ups, crunches, stretches, and, of course, running: a one-mile run. It was absolutely terrifying. The first time I completed the practice run, I ran a quarter lap and walked the rest. I felt disoriented and pitied myself the whole way through, but I didn’t want to let anyone down; I wasn’t going to quit.

With each practice, I improved my mile time little by little. But, I would still complain to my coach about how much pain I was in and how unbelievably sore I was. He would comfort me by saying that whenever I felt any pain, I could rest assured I was doing all of the warm-ups and exercises correctly. So I stopped telling him about the pain.

Surprisingly, I grew to enjoy the mile run, because it was never as arduous as the main exercises, never as new. Running started to become familiar and safe.

One day, as I was running the mile, my coach tried to catch my attention– he was waving his arms and smiling widely. As I approached him, I worried that I had done something wrong, as I was excessively critical of myself. But instead of criticism, he congratulated me for finishing the mile. I had run the mile, and had not noticed that I passed the finish line! For the first time, my mind had not been occupied with thoughts of pain in my legs or in my lungs.

As I proudly walked over to where the rest of the group waited, I started to be excited for the next day’s run.

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